Review: ToolkitRC M6 Battery Charger

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Review: ToolkitRC M6 Battery Charger


The ToolkitRC M6 LiPo Battery Charger is super small, portable and affordable. It also has some cool features that are missing in other popular higher end chargers.

Learn about the basics of LiPo Charger, and in this guide we will talk about LiPo batteries and how to handle them properly.

  • Input voltage: 7V – 28V (2S-6S)
  • Maximum Charge Power/Current: 150W / 10A
  • Maximum Discharge Power/Current: 20W / 10A
  • Supports 1S – 6S LiPo, LiHv and Li-Ion
  • USB Output 5V 2.1A

The M6 has a 1.8inch 160×128 Color LCD Screen, and non-physical touch buttons which should be more durable than the “scrolling wheels” on some other portable chargers. But personally I find the rolling wheel quicker and easier to use.

On the left, there is a XT60 connector for input power, USB port for charging smartphone and GoPro. Between these two big connectors, there is also a servo connector for testing receiver and servo.

On the right hand side, there is another XT60 connector as well as a balance lead port, for connecting the LiPo battery you want to charge, or a parallel charging board.

You can power this LiPo charger with a big LiPo battery, or any kind of power source within the specified voltage, as long as they have an XT60 connector (might require a bit of DIY). This is extremely versatile and portable.

There are two foldable stands on the bottom which I highly recommend using when sitting this on grass or uneven surface, because any pressure applied on the fan will stop it from running smoothly, which might cause overheat.

The M6 is an extremely portable charger, only half the size of the iSDT Q6! Great for field charging.

Another cool feature is the ability to test servos. It can also read and send PWM, SBUS and PPM signals, so you can troubleshoot your receivers without a flight controller which is handy.

You can also use it as a battery voltage checker, by connecting the battery’s XT60 to the output. However it won’t work if you only plug in the balance lead, it has to be the discharge lead.

It uses this “battery profile” system to save charging setting for multiple batteries. This might save you time from frequently changing setting like End Voltage, Charge Current and so on every time you charge a different battery.

However this is also what gets annoying sometimes. With the iSDT, I can just select the current and press “charge”. With the M6 I have to think about what battery I am charging, then scroll through the profile list to find the one I want… maybe I am too used to the iSDT charger.

The best way to use the M6 I find, is to just ignore the profile system, and just use it like an iSDT.

Change Cells to Auto so it detects the cell count automatically from balance lead, and you should change the charge current manually every time you start charging.

The ToolkitRC M6 LiPo Charger has got some cool features and it’s extremely compact to carry around. With 150W output power, I think it will mett a lot of people’s needs as their main charger indoor and outdoor.

However for me, I will still use the iSDT Q6 Pro as my main charger, mostly because it’s more powerful (300W) and I need that power to parallel charge multiple batteries at the same time. And also I find the scrolling wheel easier to use. But I will surely consider using the M6 for field charging thanks to the compact size.

If you don’t have a smart charger yet, the M6 is a serious contender, especially when it’s only $29.99!



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